You have to fit the job

Dear new developer,

A few years ago I was job hunting (during a hot job market and with almost two decades of experience) and had a lot of people turn me down or say I wasn’t a good fit. Sometimes it was for coding ability, sometimes it was for familiarity with various systems, sometimes it was because I wanted too much money. I have turned down or left jobs for a variety of reasons, including money, demands on my time, or even just a bad feeling.

What I want to drive home, dear new developer, is that a job needs to fit both sides. The employer and the employee should both feel like they are getting a good deal.

The honest truth is that this means that there are some jobs that you could perform well at that the employer doesn’t know, believe or trust that you can. That can be a blow when you are looking for work. I’ve been there, hungry for anything that will help pay the bills. But you have to have faith. And keep looking. There are lots of developer jobs out there, at big companies and small companies, product companies and consulting companies, software companies and companies that don’t know they are software companies yet. And often, especially as a new developer, you can get hired for your potential.

I’ve also been in jobs where I contorted myself, either a little or a lot, because I thought that was what was needed. I’m all for taking one for the team for a while and doing an unpleasant task or job. But if I have to do it for months and years then that is the wrong job for me.

You have to fit the job, and the job has to fit you.

Sincerely,

Dan

What is the best surprise of being a new developer?

Dear new developer,

I was asked recently at a talk I gave about what was the best surprise of being a new developer. I was talking at Turing School, and had discussed some of the things that surprised me when I was starting out.

There are a lot of great things about being a developer. For all that is wrong with the software industry, when you are a developer:

  • flow happens
  • you are doing office work (typically)
  • there are smart people around you
  • you are paid well (compared to many many jobs–median pay for any job in the USA is 32k in 2018 and for software developers it is 105k)
  • you get to learn all the time

So all in all it’s a pretty great job.

But the best thing and what surprised me a bit as new developer (and makes me sad) is how much developers are listened to. Or, rather, how little folks in other professions are consulted and listened to (based on anecdotal evidence and conversations, sorry no hard data).

So, being a developer (in a healthy team and company) means that your opinion is heard.

Sincerely,

Dan

Job hunting tips for new developers

Dear new developer,

Joe Marshall has some interesting tips for new developers (he calls them “junior developers to be” but developer nomenclature is so broken that I prefer the term “new”). They are focused around finding a job (and Joe has a newsletter to help 🙂 ).

They range from the simple: “Read coding interview books.” to the arduous: “Github helps, but take it beyond toys. Real projects have stakeholders.” to the practical: “Take notes during interviews.”

I purposely focus on all that you need to know to succeed as a new developer apart from getting a job (though I have written a few things about interviews). I do this for two reasons:

  1. I’m no expert at getting a job as a junior developer. It’s been a long time since I did that, and the world has changed. I’m not sure I’m a good resource to help anyone get a development job, since I’ve only gotten hired for full time employment four times in my career.
  2. There are a lot of other great resources out there, and it’s a topic that many write about (because it matters a lot)

But this choice doesn’t mean I can’t point to helpful posts elsewhere. Suggest you read the whole thing.

Sincerely,

Dan