What is the best surprise of being a new developer?

Dear new developer,

I was asked recently at a talk I gave about what was the best surprise of being a new developer. I was talking at Turing School, and had discussed some of the things that surprised me when I was starting out.

There are a lot of great things about being a developer. For all that is wrong with the software industry, when you are a developer:

  • flow happens
  • you are doing office work (typically)
  • there are smart people around you
  • you are paid well (compared to many many jobs–median pay for any job in the USA is 32k in 2018 and for software developers it is 105k)
  • you get to learn all the time

So all in all it’s a pretty great job.

But the best thing and what surprised me a bit as new developer (and makes me sad) is how much developers are listened to. Or, rather, how little folks in other professions are consulted and listened to (based on anecdotal evidence and conversations, sorry no hard data).

So, being a developer (in a healthy team and company) means that your opinion is heard.

Sincerely,

Dan

Job hunting tips for new developers

Dear new developer,

Joe Marshall has some interesting tips for new developers (he calls them “junior developers to be” but developer nomenclature is so broken that I prefer the term “new”). They are focused around finding a job (and Joe has a newsletter to help 🙂 ).

They range from the simple: “Read coding interview books.” to the arduous: “Github helps, but take it beyond toys. Real projects have stakeholders.” to the practical: “Take notes during interviews.”

I purposely focus on all that you need to know to succeed as a new developer apart from getting a job (though I have written a few things about interviews). I do this for two reasons:

  1. I’m no expert at getting a job as a junior developer. It’s been a long time since I did that, and the world has changed. I’m not sure I’m a good resource to help anyone get a development job, since I’ve only gotten hired for full time employment four times in my career.
  2. There are a lot of other great resources out there, and it’s a topic that many write about (because it matters a lot)

But this choice doesn’t mean I can’t point to helpful posts elsewhere. Suggest you read the whole thing.

Sincerely,

Dan