You have to fit the job

Dear new developer,

A few years ago I was job hunting (during a hot job market and with almost two decades of experience) and had a lot of people turn me down or say I wasn’t a good fit. Sometimes it was for coding ability, sometimes it was for familiarity with various systems, sometimes it was because I wanted too much money. I have turned down or left jobs for a variety of reasons, including money, demands on my time, or even just a bad feeling.

What I want to drive home, dear new developer, is that a job needs to fit both sides. The employer and the employee should both feel like they are getting a good deal.

The honest truth is that this means that there are some jobs that you could perform well at that the employer doesn’t know, believe or trust that you can. That can be a blow when you are looking for work. I’ve been there, hungry for anything that will help pay the bills. But you have to have faith. And keep looking. There are lots of developer jobs out there, at big companies and small companies, product companies and consulting companies, software companies and companies that don’t know they are software companies yet. And often, especially as a new developer, you can get hired for your potential.

I’ve also been in jobs where I contorted myself, either a little or a lot, because I thought that was what was needed. I’m all for taking one for the team for a while and doing an unpleasant task or job. But if I have to do it for months and years then that is the wrong job for me.

You have to fit the job, and the job has to fit you.

Sincerely,

Dan

The Cacophony of the 2019 Tech Landscape

This is a guest post from Rishi Malik. Enjoy.

Hello New Developer!

Right now, it’s Q1 2019. And there’s a lot of advice you’ll find out here on the internet. Much of it is good, some of it is bad, but the important thing to note is that these are all points of view from people. From that person to be specific. This letter is no different, this is just my view on what matters. Take it or leave it. In fact, that’s the first point I want to make.

2019 tech is full of voices. Social media, popular blogs, and news sites amplify voices and feelings. This is an awesome thing, but remember that loud views aren’t necessarily right.

What I mean, is that you’ll find points of view on everything. Developers have always loved flame wars, and pointless battles (vi vs emacs, tabs vs spaces). Now it’s “Javascript developers aren’t real engineers”, or “If you can’t code a binary search, you’re a bad engineer.”

Find yourself in all these voices. It’s not easy, and it will take time. But work on what you value, and develop your skills to who you want to be. It’s ok if you want to work by yourself on speeding up a search by .01 milliseconds. It’s equally ok if you want to ship a single page app with a brilliant user experience. Listen to the voices when they help, and ignore them when they don’t.

To help find yourself, focus on finding customers that value what you do. Most of the time, these customers are the people in the company you’re working for. But if you want to do algorithms, find people who will value that work. If you want to work on networks, find companies who need that.

It sounds obvious, but it’s an easy thing to miss when you’re looking for a job, and when you’re evaluating comp, culture, benefits, and offices. It’s also really hard to gauge from the outside of a company.

On that note, remember that the 2019 tech industry isn’t how it will always be. Right now, the job market is stellar. I mean really stellar. In most big cities, you can find a job doing just about anything you want, most of the time within a few days.

This won’t always be the case. It wasn’t years ago, and everything comes in cycles. That’s the 2nd point. Be willing to do things you didn’t think you wanted to. I worked on embedded systems when I started my career. I got into web technology not because I cared about it, but because it helped me get a job in a city I wanted to live. Turned out to a prescient choice, and opened up tons of opportunities I wouldn’t have had otherwise.

The tech choices come in cycles, but so does demand. I said before that the job market is stellar. But some of us old timers have been through the downturns. When you’re unemployed for 6 months because literally no one is hiring. When your choice is between a 50% pay cut, or a 100% pay cut. Be wise, be smart. It’s a great time to be in tech, but plan ahead for the times that are tough.

Finally, my last point is to remember that there is a world outside of tech. It’s hard when you’re in it to see that. When tech was smaller, and more insular, it was easier to remember that this is a job.

But now, tech is everywhere. Apps are everywhere. The internet is everywhere. More people are writing code, building companies, and figuring things out. But, tech is not the entirety of life. Get outside of the tech zone, and connect with people who aren’t in it. It will change how you think, and how you develop code. And it provides a much needed break from the echo chamber that is tech.

Good luck, and have fun!

Rishi

Rishi Malik is the founder of Backstop.it, a company focused on making cybersecurity easy for companies to implement.

Use LinkedIn, and use it well

Dear new developer,

Set up a LinkedIn profile and keep it up to date. This will serve as a public resume. (Yes, a github is great too, but you might not always have time to keep code up to date or an interest in a maintaining a large project.) Once a year, at a minimum, document what you’ve done in your profile. This is a low effort way to showcase your skills. LinkedIn has a vested interest in being at the top of the search results when people search for your name. And hiring managers will.

Also, used LinkedIn to record connections to people that you meet (at jobs, conferences, meetups or randomly). Folks have different thresholds for connecting (some people connect to anyone, some people want to meet you, some people want to have worked with you). It doesn’t hurt to ask; just don’t be offended if someone says no thanks. My threshold is “have I met you in person or engaged with you online”. This means that my connections are of varying strength–some connections I’d hire (or work for) with no question, others I met once and have never talked to again.

Recruiters on LinkedIn tend to be low value keyword matchers, unfortunately. But you never know, someone might be able to place you. If you do talk to a recruiter, be honest about your desires. Take what they say with a grain of salt, as when they are talking to you, they are trying to make a sale. Also make sure you ask them about their view of the job market, salary ranges for people with your experience, and good skills to gain. If they aren’t willing to share such information, they probably won’t be much good to work with.

As a friend put it, LinkedIn is a rolodex that someone else keeps up to date. This can be helpful when you are looking for a job. Troll your connections’ companies, and then ask if your connection and intro you. A warm intro is far more likely to lead to a conversation and interview than submitting a resume via a website. I offer that up to many people as it’s a low effort way to add value to someone on the job hunt.

Sincerely,

Dan