Preparing for a recruiting event

This is a guest post from Jeff Beard, lightly edited. Enjoy.

Dear New Developer,

Preparing for a university job fair or similar recruiting event is very important if you want to make an impression that results in a phone screen.

A hiring manager and their recruiters receive an enormous number of contacts and resumes from a variety of channels so you have to be able to stand out from the crowd in a very short amount of time, often measured in seconds.

However, when you are at a recruiting event you have a unique opportunity to make an impression since you will get to talk directly to a recruiter or even a hiring manager. So you need to be fully prepared to exploit that short window of opportunity.

Here are a few important things to prepare in order to make the most of that moment:

  • Resume
  • The Introduction
  • The Conversation
  • Appearance

Resume

A resume is something of a pitch deck that you use to get attention and tell your story. It’s also a notepad and reminder for a recruiter or hiring manager to go back to in order to find you in the huge pile of resumes they collect. Or, sadly, to figure out what goes into the recycle bin now versus later (it’s no joke: a desk covered with hundreds of resumes requires triage.)

To begin with, make sure that you have complete basic information such as address, phone, email, GPA, and graduation date (for students) at the top of your resume.

There are a few important attributes that a hiring manager is looking for and that you want to show with your resume:

  • Motivated
  • Passionate
  • Skilled
  • Adaptable
  • Collaborative
  • Articulate

Since you are early in your career you won’t have as much work experience so you should make projects the centerpiece of your resume. In fact, even later in your career, a highly informative discussion can be had around projects that reveal the attributes noted above. For any project on your resume you should be able to speak to:

  • The purpose of the project
  • Why it was important
  • Did you work on a team
  • How did the team self-organize
  • How you overcame challenges
  • What was the outcome
  • Why you liked the project

Importantly, what a good hiring manager is looking for is intrinsic motivation. We want folks that are naturally excited about the domain they are looking to enter for their career.

So put your favorite project at the top of the list and drive the conversation to that project if you can. The person you are talking to needs to see what lights you up and there is native passion for your favorite project that you need to let shine through.The project description should be brief and to the point, with a focus on the “what”, “why”, and the outcome. A project description doesn’t need to be burdened with the tech used unless it adds to the overall narrative.

Projects don’t have to be school class projects or work experience. They can be side hustles, Open Source, personal interest, or Hackathon projects.

If you haven’t done a lot of projects, take the initiative to find a couple of projects to work on. If you are in school or in your first job and it’s not producing projects that engage you, seek them out or invent them yourself. This will be reflected in your resume and will send a signal that you are curious, passionate about the domain, and look beyond what you are doing day to day for interesting problems to solve.

One final bit of advice on resumes, is that you can have more than one resume for different audiences. For example if you are equally interested in DevOps and software development, craft two different resumes that highlight projects and work experience in each category. You can also optimize resumes for different industries to highlight aspects of your experience or interests that cast you in a good light for that market.

The Introduction

The introduction is a critical face to face interaction that is your opportunity to form a connection with a potential hiring manager or recruiter. There is an incredibly short window of opportunity to impress the person which means you need to say a few impactful words, delivered with confidence.

When you approach the company representative, reach out to shake hands while you say hello and start your introduction. People receive signals from a handshake so don’t go soft and don’t be aggressive. Just a firm, confident handshake will do the trick. Practice with friends.

I personally will listen for about a minute before I interrupt and direct the conversation to, say, the resume in a candidate’s hand but it’s important to have a story that is concise, to the point, and well rehearsed.

The introduction should contain your name, your college program and graduation date (if appropriate), what you are passionate about, what role you are looking for, what your interest is in the company, and why you would be successful. It’s a brief statement of intent and a value proposition signal. You should practice saying it out loud often enough that you can deliver it with a practiced confidence, energy and restrained enthusiasm while looking the person straight in the eye.

Don’t make assumptions about the person you are talking to; ask them what their role is at the company. If they are technical, this is an opportunity to signal your depth. If they are not, you can tailor the conversation accordingly.

Also don’t launch into a description of every item on your resume; exercise restraint and stay focused on a concise introduction that will lead into a conversation.

Finally, like resumes, you can have more than one introduction crafted for different audiences.

The Conversation

Your introduction will lead into a very short, general conversation which you also need to be prepared for. If the introduction is the hook, then this conversation is closing the deal on a phone screen. (Note you are not closing the deal on a job or an interview, that’s later. You just want a second look which is what the phone screen is.)

You get it by handing the recruiter or hiring manager your resume to scan and ask their questions. Have a ready answer for everything on your resume including any questions about whether or not things went bad on a project or an obviously short tenure at one of your jobs.

You should also seek to align your interests with what the company does which requires research.

At most career fairs there is a list of companies available ahead of time so you can research them and target the companies that do work that best aligns with your interests. If you aren’t sure about what your passions are or it’s hard to figure out what the company does, be prepared to put that out there right away. Some of the most awkward moments are when someone tries to improvise what they think my company does. Don’t improvise, do the research. It’s easy, and pays dividends.

Just identify a few things that the company does to show interest and then ask about other things the company does and what market they operate in. What’s important is that you show that you are interested and motivated enough to do the research. This also helps with the common question you may get: “why do you want to work for Willard’s Widgets?” If you’ve done the research you’ll have a good idea of whether you can honestly say that whatever they do is super interesting and you’ve love to help the company be successful.

Other questions you can ask are “what is the culture like?”, “tell me about an exciting initiative at the company”, and as you wrap up the conversation you could ask “when can I expect to hear back?”

To get extra credit educate yourself on the industry that the company operates in. If you can speak intelligently about the major trends in a market and tie it to what a company does, you are instantly distinguished from your peers. Very few early career candidates pay much attention to the business side of things but it’s important to understand the industry you work in, especially as you mature in your career.

Appearance

No need to wear a suit; it’s not the norm for our industry except for executives (and even then there are a lot of hoodies and t-shirts in the wild). But don’t wear pajamas with bunny slippers either. Casual clothes that are clean and not shredded, a folder full of printed resumes, and a cell phone are what you need when you step up to the table to confidently deliver that well-practiced introduction.

If you are comfortable with it, you can add something colorful, or otherwise visibly interesting or memorable, to your outfit that makes you stand out from the blue jeans/black leggings and t-shirt crowd. Don’t be silly or obnoxious, just wear or add something visual and unique to your outfit or just make it more colorful in general. It provides something else for the hiring manager or recruiter to associate with a good conversation when they’re digging through a pile of resumes, trying to decide who to call.

Finally, job fairs can be taxing so make sure you take breaks and have access to snacks and drinks to power you through the event and keep up your energy levels.

Sincerely,

Jeff

Jeff Beard is a director of software development at Oracle Data Cloud. He would also like to acknowledge Caitlin Hickey and Mridula Natrajan for their help editing this post.

You have to fit the job

Dear new developer,

A few years ago I was job hunting (during a hot job market and with almost two decades of experience) and had a lot of people turn me down or say I wasn’t a good fit. Sometimes it was for coding ability, sometimes it was for familiarity with various systems, sometimes it was because I wanted too much money. I have turned down or left jobs for a variety of reasons, including money, demands on my time, or even just a bad feeling.

What I want to drive home, dear new developer, is that a job needs to fit both sides. The employer and the employee should both feel like they are getting a good deal.

The honest truth is that this means that there are some jobs that you could perform well at that the employer doesn’t know, believe or trust that you can. That can be a blow when you are looking for work. I’ve been there, hungry for anything that will help pay the bills. But you have to have faith. And keep looking. There are lots of developer jobs out there, at big companies and small companies, product companies and consulting companies, software companies and companies that don’t know they are software companies yet. And often, especially as a new developer, you can get hired for your potential.

I’ve also been in jobs where I contorted myself, either a little or a lot, because I thought that was what was needed. I’m all for taking one for the team for a while and doing an unpleasant task or job. But if I have to do it for months and years then that is the wrong job for me.

You have to fit the job, and the job has to fit you.

Sincerely,

Dan

The Cacophony of the 2019 Tech Landscape

This is a guest post from Rishi Malik. Enjoy.

Hello New Developer!

Right now, it’s Q1 2019. And there’s a lot of advice you’ll find out here on the internet. Much of it is good, some of it is bad, but the important thing to note is that these are all points of view from people. From that person to be specific. This letter is no different, this is just my view on what matters. Take it or leave it. In fact, that’s the first point I want to make.

2019 tech is full of voices. Social media, popular blogs, and news sites amplify voices and feelings. This is an awesome thing, but remember that loud views aren’t necessarily right.

What I mean, is that you’ll find points of view on everything. Developers have always loved flame wars, and pointless battles (vi vs emacs, tabs vs spaces). Now it’s “Javascript developers aren’t real engineers”, or “If you can’t code a binary search, you’re a bad engineer.”

Find yourself in all these voices. It’s not easy, and it will take time. But work on what you value, and develop your skills to who you want to be. It’s ok if you want to work by yourself on speeding up a search by .01 milliseconds. It’s equally ok if you want to ship a single page app with a brilliant user experience. Listen to the voices when they help, and ignore them when they don’t.

To help find yourself, focus on finding customers that value what you do. Most of the time, these customers are the people in the company you’re working for. But if you want to do algorithms, find people who will value that work. If you want to work on networks, find companies who need that.

It sounds obvious, but it’s an easy thing to miss when you’re looking for a job, and when you’re evaluating comp, culture, benefits, and offices. It’s also really hard to gauge from the outside of a company.

On that note, remember that the 2019 tech industry isn’t how it will always be. Right now, the job market is stellar. I mean really stellar. In most big cities, you can find a job doing just about anything you want, most of the time within a few days.

This won’t always be the case. It wasn’t years ago, and everything comes in cycles. That’s the 2nd point. Be willing to do things you didn’t think you wanted to. I worked on embedded systems when I started my career. I got into web technology not because I cared about it, but because it helped me get a job in a city I wanted to live. Turned out to a prescient choice, and opened up tons of opportunities I wouldn’t have had otherwise.

The tech choices come in cycles, but so does demand. I said before that the job market is stellar. But some of us old timers have been through the downturns. When you’re unemployed for 6 months because literally no one is hiring. When your choice is between a 50% pay cut, or a 100% pay cut. Be wise, be smart. It’s a great time to be in tech, but plan ahead for the times that are tough.

Finally, my last point is to remember that there is a world outside of tech. It’s hard when you’re in it to see that. When tech was smaller, and more insular, it was easier to remember that this is a job.

But now, tech is everywhere. Apps are everywhere. The internet is everywhere. More people are writing code, building companies, and figuring things out. But, tech is not the entirety of life. Get outside of the tech zone, and connect with people who aren’t in it. It will change how you think, and how you develop code. And it provides a much needed break from the echo chamber that is tech.

Good luck, and have fun!

Rishi

Rishi Malik is the founder of Backstop.it, a company focused on making cybersecurity easy for companies to implement.

Use LinkedIn, and use it well

Dear new developer,

Set up a LinkedIn profile and keep it up to date. This will serve as a public resume. (Yes, a github is great too, but you might not always have time to keep code up to date or an interest in a maintaining a large project.) Once a year, at a minimum, document what you’ve done in your profile. This is a low effort way to showcase your skills. LinkedIn has a vested interest in being at the top of the search results when people search for your name. And hiring managers will.

Also, used LinkedIn to record connections to people that you meet (at jobs, conferences, meetups or randomly). Folks have different thresholds for connecting (some people connect to anyone, some people want to meet you, some people want to have worked with you). It doesn’t hurt to ask; just don’t be offended if someone says no thanks. My threshold is “have I met you in person or engaged with you online”. This means that my connections are of varying strength–some connections I’d hire (or work for) with no question, others I met once and have never talked to again.

Recruiters on LinkedIn tend to be low value keyword matchers, unfortunately. But you never know, someone might be able to place you. If you do talk to a recruiter, be honest about your desires. Take what they say with a grain of salt, as when they are talking to you, they are trying to make a sale. Also make sure you ask them about their view of the job market, salary ranges for people with your experience, and good skills to gain. If they aren’t willing to share such information, they probably won’t be much good to work with.

As a friend put it, LinkedIn is a rolodex that someone else keeps up to date. This can be helpful when you are looking for a job. Troll your connections’ companies, and then ask if your connection and intro you. A warm intro is far more likely to lead to a conversation and interview than submitting a resume via a website. I offer that up to many people as it’s a low effort way to add value to someone on the job hunt.

Sincerely,

Dan