Balance Questions With “Banging Your Head”

This is a guest blog post from Don Abrams, lightly edited. Enjoy.

Dear new developer,

When starting out, the hard part is balancing two things:

  • Asking questions
  • Banging your head against the wall

Additionally, as a new developer you’ll likely be encountering something for the first time: a codebase that is really really large. Like large enough no one knows all of it. You’ll want to learn how to navigate the codebase ASAP. Every place is different. If you can checkout all the code and get the product running in less than a day, you’re at a world-class shop. If it’s more than a week, I’m sorry.

After you learn to navigate the code, my recommendation is then to learn and copy the patterns that other team members use. So your questions should mostly be “how did someone solve this before?” or “hey, have you seen anything like this before?” If you look at the code they referenced and still have questions, then bring it back up ASAP.

If someone offers to pair, DO IT! Tip on pairing as a junior: be the keyboard and basically have them tell you what to do. You’ll learn how they think about the codebase and learn to navigate it better. You’ll feel stupid when they tell you “just” to do something, but those are the things you need to know. (“just XXX” signals that XXX is complex thing that you’ll take for granted soon– documenting those will really help the next junior).

I also recommend reading a LOT of code.Then, as you get a better command of the codebase and team patterns (3-6 months), you can start asking questions like “why did someone solve this before this way?”

That’s when it gets fun.

Sincerely,

Don Abrams

Don Abrams has over 10 years of software development experience and recently moved to France.

It will turn out mostly fine… if you have the passion

This is a guest post from Jenn Chu. Enjoy.

‘Passion is one great force that unleashes creativity, because if you’re passionate about something, then you’re more willing to take risks’
~Yo-Yo Ma

Dear new developer,

I’ve always taken the quote above to heart… fast-shooting myself into the named camp of ‘Career Switchers` when talking about entry into the world of development. I’ve majored in Mechanical Engineer, spent 10 years in the Oil Industry, and just the last year and a half, really immersed myself into development.

I started at a Bootcamp part-time, got the certificate, quit my job, moved to a new city, worked as a Bootcamp TA and then finally landed my first job as an Associate Developer. It definitely wasn’t an easy journey, but I was passionate about this new life decision and I became obsessed. If not for the passion that led to a slight obsession, it would have been 10x harder to get to where I am.

For a new developer starting out, I’d love to tell you that it will turn out just fine… it mostly does… if you are passionate and have the drive. Learning new technology is not the only thing you should do to give you the edge. You must also go out, meet people, network, make projects, breathe… and then repeat. Learn the technology by finding out how it works more so than just watching tutorials. Meet the community and find coding and project buddies. Make projects for ideas to improve your life, or the life of others.

What I found most helpful in this whole process is having a mentor. Find a like-minded individual that is genuine and genuinely wants to be invested in your new journey. There is so much experience and knowledge that can be shared between both individuals, it truly is a beneficial experience for all involved.

Again, never stop learning, doing, networking and above all, doing what you do, what you are passionate about. The light at the end of the tunnel starts to get brighter and brighter with each passing day, have faith and take the risks! Life is too short otherwise.

– Jenn

Jenn Chu is a software Developer passionate about good design and building simple solutions that will enhance the end user’s experience. She is most excited to bring the diverse community together through collaboration, communication, and connections.

The Cacophony of the 2019 Tech Landscape

This is a guest post from Rishi Malik. Enjoy.

Hello New Developer!

Right now, it’s Q1 2019. And there’s a lot of advice you’ll find out here on the internet. Much of it is good, some of it is bad, but the important thing to note is that these are all points of view from people. From that person to be specific. This letter is no different, this is just my view on what matters. Take it or leave it. In fact, that’s the first point I want to make.

2019 tech is full of voices. Social media, popular blogs, and news sites amplify voices and feelings. This is an awesome thing, but remember that loud views aren’t necessarily right.

What I mean, is that you’ll find points of view on everything. Developers have always loved flame wars, and pointless battles (vi vs emacs, tabs vs spaces). Now it’s “Javascript developers aren’t real engineers”, or “If you can’t code a binary search, you’re a bad engineer.”

Find yourself in all these voices. It’s not easy, and it will take time. But work on what you value, and develop your skills to who you want to be. It’s ok if you want to work by yourself on speeding up a search by .01 milliseconds. It’s equally ok if you want to ship a single page app with a brilliant user experience. Listen to the voices when they help, and ignore them when they don’t.

To help find yourself, focus on finding customers that value what you do. Most of the time, these customers are the people in the company you’re working for. But if you want to do algorithms, find people who will value that work. If you want to work on networks, find companies who need that.

It sounds obvious, but it’s an easy thing to miss when you’re looking for a job, and when you’re evaluating comp, culture, benefits, and offices. It’s also really hard to gauge from the outside of a company.

On that note, remember that the 2019 tech industry isn’t how it will always be. Right now, the job market is stellar. I mean really stellar. In most big cities, you can find a job doing just about anything you want, most of the time within a few days.

This won’t always be the case. It wasn’t years ago, and everything comes in cycles. That’s the 2nd point. Be willing to do things you didn’t think you wanted to. I worked on embedded systems when I started my career. I got into web technology not because I cared about it, but because it helped me get a job in a city I wanted to live. Turned out to a prescient choice, and opened up tons of opportunities I wouldn’t have had otherwise.

The tech choices come in cycles, but so does demand. I said before that the job market is stellar. But some of us old timers have been through the downturns. When you’re unemployed for 6 months because literally no one is hiring. When your choice is between a 50% pay cut, or a 100% pay cut. Be wise, be smart. It’s a great time to be in tech, but plan ahead for the times that are tough.

Finally, my last point is to remember that there is a world outside of tech. It’s hard when you’re in it to see that. When tech was smaller, and more insular, it was easier to remember that this is a job.

But now, tech is everywhere. Apps are everywhere. The internet is everywhere. More people are writing code, building companies, and figuring things out. But, tech is not the entirety of life. Get outside of the tech zone, and connect with people who aren’t in it. It will change how you think, and how you develop code. And it provides a much needed break from the echo chamber that is tech.

Good luck, and have fun!

Rishi

Rishi Malik is the founder of Backstop.it, a company focused on making cybersecurity easy for companies to implement.

Avoid The Impossible Goal of Being a Know It All

This is a guest blog post from Rick Manelius. Enjoy.

Dear new developer,

Can you name all 50 US states? How about their capitals? Every city in the US? Every town? Could you list the GPS coordinates of every coffee shop?

Of course, you can’t, wouldn’t, and don’t. It would be absurd to spend the time and effort to memorize such a vast amount of information that you can Google within seconds. Yet developers often fall into the trap of over preparing and learning a myriad of facts and syntax trivia for a new programming language or framework before diving in and getting their hands dirty.

A personal example: When I landed my first contract as a web developer, I recommended Drupal for the client’s project. However, I was deathly afraid of not being able to address any questions that might come up. To satisfy my “need to know it all” before I put forth an initial proposal, I purchased have a dozen ebooks and read the more popular ones cover to cover several times. Meanwhile, I was only dabbling in writing code by following the tutorials.  Unfortunately, this was about as effective as trying to learn a foreign language without a practice partner. The information was forgotten almost as soon as I learned it.

I contrast this with how quickly my experience and skills grew when I started to give myself the permission to play, to test, to tinker, and to interact with the community through IRC and the issue queue. It was there that I would run into a blocker and use those eBooks as a useful resource because I had a specific purpose in mind. Moreover, when I couldn’t find my answer there or with Google, I could lean on others that were actively learning, growing, and sharing along their career trajectory.

Years later, I discovered this humbling infographic titled Becoming a Web Developer in 2017. I love this because it highlights the absurdity in trying to learn everything about everything in the web dev ecosystem. While all sites eventually roll up to HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, the number of underlying technologies used to support them is visually overwhelming.

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A select infographic from The Web Developer Roadmap 2017

Each of the boxes represents a different subject matter. Each of these subject matters has additional, hidden complexity. Also, within that, there might be subsystems that maybe only a few core maintainers of that specific project would understand. Each box may take a day or a week to learn the basics, but perhaps months to years to master.

Trying to do that for every topic becomes an overwhelming investment of time for increasingly diminishing returns. It’s equivalent to learning the GPS coordinates of every coffee shop in the US.

To make matters worse, this infographic only represents the hard skills necessary to produce and maintain the software and its supporting infrastructure. It says nothing about the soft skills of how to participate and grow a high-performance team, how to make solid architectural choices, how open source governance works, how to handle change and release management, how to apply different project management methodologies, etc.

Before I overwhelm you any further…

…there is hope.

You don’t need to know it all. In fact, some of the most successful developers I’ve come to know are skilled searchers and askers. They may not know the information, but they know where it could be. They know how to parse documentation to find the salient details they need to accomplish the task at hand. They have a network of colleagues in other specializations that they can lean on for help. They are confident in asking even basic questions (gasp) in public, because while it may seem obvious for many, there is always at least 1 other person who has the same question.

Let’s look at the medical profession for inspiration. While they all go to school for 6-12 years to gain a base level proficiency, they can then either stick to general practice or hone in on a dizzying array of specialties. When we get sick, we start by going to our primary care doctor. Their goal is to identify and solve the problem there, or narrow down the answer space and refer you to a specialist. Unfortunately, even the specialists don’t always know what the issue is. This is why people sometimes need 2nd or 3rd opinions.

The good news is that in software we don’t need to go to a school for a decade to get started with experimentation or specialization. We are one tutorial and terminal prompt away from trying a new language or checking out a new library and testing it in a local sandbox where little to no damage can be done. There is so much power in this! And it’s also where it can be overwhelming given the 28 million public code repositories on GitHub alone.

Adopt a Hive Mind Approach

We live in a golden age of sharing and collaboration. Developers from all around the world ask and answer questions on Stack Overflow. They write tutorials and howtos on their blogs or Medium. In any given city, there may be anywhere from 1 to 20 tech Meetups a week. There are podcasts, Reddit channels, newsletter aggregators, and active conversations on Twitter.

By asking, discussing, and sharing openly in one or more of these venues, you are adopting a hive mind approach. You are both able to contribute to and receive ideas, perspectives, and solutions. It’s hard to overstate the importance of this strategy and mindset. In my experience, it’s many times more valuable than reading the 3rd or 4th ebook on a given subject (although these are often a useful reference). Beyond just discovering technical solutions, interactions with other developers often result in friendships that can last well beyond the burning framework question you had when you first met them.

So my advice (take it or leave it) is to abandon the lone wolf, know-it-all approach to software development. Instead, learn to contribute to and draw from the collective skills, talents, and experience from our fantastic community that is literally all around you IF you are willing to connect with them.

Final point. I stayed isolated for years until I broke into the Drupal community. Once I did, my career rapidly transformed. I wrote about that here.

So get out there! And good luck!

– Rick

Rick Manelius is an MIT engineer turned web developer turned startup CXO (operations, product, and technology). You can connect and learn more on his personal blog and his LinkedIn profile.

Tips from a recent bootcamp graduate

This is a guest blog post from Jesse Ling. Enjoy.

Dear new developer,

Be comfortable with being uncomfortable. You’ll never know all the things. And that’s ok.

Ask questions – at the right time. There’s a fine line between reaching out for help too early and too late. Struggling is imperative to growth, but reaching out for answers too soon significantly hinders it. You’ll better understand where that line lives over time.

“Stand on the shoulders of giants.” More than likely, your problem has already been solved. Don’t be afraid of trying other’s solutions if it makes sense for your implementation. But do take the time to fully understand why and how it works.

Be persistent. Programming is difficult and often times frustrating. Don’t give up. The feeling of figuring things out after a struggle is amazing.

Network. Talk to devs at, below, and above your skill level. Opportunities can present themselves in mysterious ways. Utilize your network to not only help yourself, but more importantly to help others.

Sincerely,

Jesse Ling

Jesse Ling is a motivated and relentless problem solver, and a recent Turing School graduate seeking web development opportunities.

Outcomes over output

This is a guest blog post from Mark Sawers. Enjoy.

Dear new developer,

As a software engineer, it’s easy to take our eye off the ball. The ball we really want to pay attention to isn’t the stuff we focused on in college. The ball is improving business/organizational outcomes. There isn’t a course of study or advanced degree on this, because it’s bespoke and custom to every organization.

You are on a team in your organization’s grand game to help the underserved, make money for shareholders, find some cure, save the planet or whatever its mission. A software-intensive system improves information access, automates task, entertains, etc. You pair with your business discipline in conceiving, building, testing and operating systems that advance the game.

Your real value to your organization is in improving outcomes. Not directly in how well you wield language X, tool Y, process Z. Not in how many features you add in a sprint, how many bugs you fix in one day, how much code you reviewed yesterday, how many answers you posted in slack, how many documents you wrote last month, and so on. Those are just means to an end.

Yes we need to constantly develop and hone technical skills (analysis, modeling, diagramming, programming, unit testing and others) and tool knowledge (languages, frameworks, utilities, operating systems, and more), but don’t mistake this for the end-game. Yes we should measure productivity; we do care about efficiency and throughput. But more product features, the latest tech, continuous deployment, two-factor authentication, and so on are not the goal. More is usually less, in my experience as a user. Isn’t that yours as well?

The goal is not output; the goal is outcome. The outcome is more revenue, more profit, more users, more product availability, happier users … right?

So, wait, isn’t that someone else’s job? What do you know about forecasting and measuring profit, anticipating user needs? Isn’t that on the product owner? The product manager? Marketing? And isn’t uptime the operations team’s responsibility? And finding problems the QA team’s responsibility?

You are on a multi-disciplinary team. You have at least one vital role to play on this team. Engineering is your trained discipline, and likely you focused purely on development. The smaller the company/business unit, the more hats you will wear. Yes your main contribution is technical, but in service of the bottom line. But don’t stay in your lane! Different perspectives are essential to this game. Your product owner doesn’t have a patent on designing end user features. And she may not be thinking about measuring success. Help her define the metrics and build those collection and reporting tools into the product. After you deploy a new feature, assess its success; don’t immediately move on to the next feature.

OK, so do I eat my own dog food? I try. The tech side requires lots of cognitive space, and so outcomes are easily short-shafted. Also, I have found this holistic perspective difficult to practice in large organizations. There is lots of specialization. It fragments responsibility. Incentives are set along discipline silos. My suggestion is to play your organization’s games (don’t leave that bonus on the table!) but bring your enlightened perspective as best you can.

Good luck,
Mark

Mark Sawers has been practicing software engineering for almost 25 years, as a developer, architect and manager. You can find his blog at http://sawers.com/blog and his LinkedIn profile at https://linkedin.com/in/marksawers .

You can do this.

This is a guest blog post from Kyle Coberly. Enjoy.

Dear new developer,

You can do this. There’s a lifetime of stuff to learn and it will seem intimidating, but if you keep doing it, you’ll get better. Teenagers, career changers, and retirees all have done this, and they weren’t any smarter or more naturally talented than you. You’re in the right place.

Make stuff. It’s easy to get lost in a bunch of theory, especially when it’s dressed up as “the fundamentals.” You can learn theory any time. Seriously. Learn what you need to learn to make something that interests you, and you’ll learn a lot and get enough fuel to get to the next station.

Participate in the software community. Go to meetups, join a community forum or chat group, go to conferences. There’s a lot of people exactly where you are, and a lot of people who were there not so long ago and want to help you get better.

Sincerely,

Kyle Coberly

Kyle Coberly is the executive director of the Develop Denver conference, co-host of the Sprint UX Podcast, and serves as the Technical Lead for Health Scholars. Previously, he was the Faculty Director for Galvanize’s Web Development Immersion program.