Use LinkedIn, and use it well

Dear new developer,

Set up a LinkedIn profile and keep it up to date. This will serve as a public resume. (Yes, a github is great too, but you might not always have time to keep code up to date or an interest in a maintaining a large project.) Once a year, at a minimum, document what you’ve done in your profile. This is a low effort way to showcase your skills. LinkedIn has a vested interest in being at the top of the search results when people search for your name. And hiring managers will.

Also, used LinkedIn to record connections to people that you meet (at jobs, conferences, meetups or randomly). Folks have different thresholds for connecting (some people connect to anyone, some people want to meet you, some people want to have worked with you). It doesn’t hurt to ask; just don’t be offended if someone says no thanks. My threshold is “have I met you in person or engaged with you online”. This means that my connections are of varying strength–some connections I’d hire (or work for) with no question, others I met once and have never talked to again.

Recruiters on LinkedIn tend to be low value keyword matchers, unfortunately. But you never know, someone might be able to place you. If you do talk to a recruiter, be honest about your desires. Take what they say with a grain of salt, as when they are talking to you, they are trying to make a sale. Also make sure you ask them about their view of the job market, salary ranges for people with your experience, and good skills to gain. If they aren’t willing to share such information, they probably won’t be much good to work with.

As a friend put it, LinkedIn is a rolodex that someone else keeps up to date. This can be helpful when you are looking for a job. Troll your connections’ companies, and then ask if your connection and intro you. A warm intro is far more likely to lead to a conversation and interview than submitting a resume via a website. I offer that up to many people as it’s a low effort way to add value to someone on the job hunt.

Sincerely,

Dan

Join a meetup

Dear new developer,

You are probably pretty overwhelmed right now. There is a lot on your plate and you probably are just trying to keep up with the job.

I hate to do this, but I am going to ask you for some extra curricular time.

You need to join a technology meetup. Go to meetup.com and search for one on your area, covering technology that you’d like to understand more about. Sign up and go to the next one. If there’s no meetup in the area, search for a virtual one, and join via video chat or audio chat.

When you are at the meetup, you might have a hard time chatting with people (I do!). I find the best way to do this is to be interested in them. Show up 15 minutes early. Find someone standing alone and walk up to them and introduce yourself. Then ask what brings them to the meetup and what they are working on. This will be awkward at first, but just like coding, gets easier the more you do it. (Not sure how to do this virtually, but try to chat with someone on the webinar.)

Then, sit down and enjoy the presentations. You’ll probably learn something.

Why should you do this?

  • It will expose you to new ideas that you can bring to your work
  • It will allow you to have professional conversations where the stakes don’t feel as high (you can admit ignorance to a total stranger more easily than to your boss).
  • It will allow you to practice networking and talking to strangers, but the topic will be something you know you are interested in.
  • You can make friends, or at least acquaintances in your industry.
  • When you are ready to hunt for a new job, you will have a network outside of your colleagues.
  • You will meet cool people.
  • You will learn new things.

You may, in time, choose to help organize or speak. These activities are valuable for your work life, but again are easier to practice outside of the work environment. But if all you do is attend a a single meetup regularly, you will still come out ahead.

Please, go sign up for a meetup today.

Sincerely,

Dan