Think about your career risk budget

Dear new developer,

In certain areas of software operations, the concept of an error budget makes an appearance. An error budget is a way of tracking how often errors occur. When the budget is exceeded, you spend time and energy to decrease them.

Having a number like this is a good way to align different areas of the business with the reality that at a certain scale and complexity, issues will arise. When this happens, the question is always, should you spend time fixing the issue or working on new functionality? The error budget helps make the answer clearer. (There’s a lot more to this concept and the link above is worth digging into.)

In the same way, you have a career risk budget. You will work for approximately 40 years, give or take a decade. Each job and career move you make is important, because if you move jobs every three years (on average) you get only 14 different opportunities. These are complex decisions; how can you choose which job at any given time is the right fit? Here are three things I consider:

Goals

This is a very common one. Is this new job moving me toward my goals? Goals can differ for each person, but here are common questions I ask:

  • Is it the tech stack I want? (The older I get, the less this matters to me, but it still matters.)
  • Am I working in an interesting domain?
  • Is this the size of company I want?
  • Will I have opportunities to grow?
  • Will things like work life balance expectations and culture be in line with what I think I want or have enjoyed in the past?

These are all trying to get at an answer to the question: Can I see myself at this company for a while?

It’s always worth writing down your goals and seeing if the company can help you meet them. But it’s also tough to be really clear on goals a few years out sometimes. After all, if you’d asked me in 2016 if I wanted to work in DevRel, I’d have said “maybe??”. Another filter for considering a career move is comp.

Money

I love writing software. I do it for fun sometimes. But the fundamental employer employee relationship is through compensation. I give an employer my time, knowledge, experience and energy. They give me money.

So there’s nothing wrong with picking a job based on money. In fact, from my experience and the experience of others I’ve talked to and read about, switching jobs appears to be the best way to get solid salary raises, especially in the current market. Some of the numbers I’ve seen are eye popping, including double digit increases. You won’t get that at the same company, typically. (However, I did get some double digit raises early in my career, from 42k->55k at one company, so it isn’t out of the question.)

Make sure chasing a higher salary aligns with your career goals too. Funnily enough, jobs in software which are unpleasant, career limiting or otherwise less desirable often pay more (the free market at work). So when you see that junior engineer position using MUMPS which pays 10k more than other positions you’ve seen, find out why.

Money is important, but not the only thing to chase. There are risks to any job and it’s worth thinking about them.

Risk budget

Another approach to fold in is your risk budget. There are all kinds of risks, but you want to look at financial, emotional and career risks.

  • Is the company going to be able to pay you? Do they have a viable business model? Do you feel like buying a lottery ticket (equity) with your time?
  • How are you going to feel working at this company? A valued part of the team, or an expense to be managed (or, worse, minimized)?
  • Is this position, in terms of responsibility, technology, and growth opportunities, going to help or hinder your career?

You can’t, of course, quantify all of these precisely, but you can assign relative numbers to them. This can be helpful when comparing opportunities, either side by side or over time.

Risk budgets change as you age, as well. For example, your financial risk budget may decrease as you have more obligations. On the other hand, it may increase if you build up savings or have a cushion.

As I get older, the team I am a part of has become more important and the precise technology less important. But that’s me. You need to take some time and think about what matters to you.

Sometimes you have to take a job to have a job. I get that and have been in that position. But if you have the luxury to have some patience, consider the above three factors and don’t forget your risk budget.

Sincerely,

Dan

Why Developers Should Engage in Continuous Learning

This is a guest post from Jerrin Samuel. Enjoy.

Dear new developer,

Software development is a field that evolves quickly and constantly. These changes keep things exciting and interesting, but can also make you feel like you are falling behind all the time.

Engaging in continuous learning is one of the solutions you can look into to stay updated in your profession and avoid feeling left out.

Continuous learning refers to the process of learning new knowledge and skills on an ongoing basis.

This type of learning can come in various forms, including enrolling in formal programs, such as taking up technical training courses, attending seminars, and engaging in self-study. It can also be sponsored by the employer or take place within the company, or it can be personal.

Benefits of Actively Participating in Continuous Learning

Continuous learning provides professionals in the field of software development several benefits, which include:

Remaining relevant

Since software development is a constantly evolving field, you need to stay up-to-date with all the changes that come up.

Taking up development or IT courses allows you to keep up with the latest trends. Moreover, you can broaden your knowledge and skills, enabling you to adjust and function effectively in the dynamic world field of technology.

If you want to remain valuable in your organization, you have to learn new things constantly.

Boosting your profile

Learning constantly means you are continuously growing and improving.

This also means adding more skills to your CV and profiles on various recruitment and job posting sites. These additional highlights can make your profile stand out and catch the eye of more recruiters and employers.

The certificates you gain and the recommendations by your managers and colleagues will also make your profile more attractive.

Improving your employability

Professionals who are constantly learning and upgrading their skills create a higher market value for themselves.

This is because employees that always stay relevant are highly sought after in the job market. As a result, employers go another mile to hire or retain them.

Preparing for the unexpected

Continuous learning helps you acquire skills that can propel you towards achieving success not only in your current workplace, but also in other companies.

Since the economy can be erratic at times, you need to be prepared for the possibility that you may lose your job. Having broader, up-to-date skills can increase your chances of getting employed again as soon as possible.

Your broader range of skills can also give you the confidence you need to take on new job opportunities so that you can get employed faster.

Increasing your self-esteem

Learning new things gives you a feeling of accomplishment. This, in turn, enhances your confidence and belief in your capabilities.

As a result, you will also feel more ready and confident to take on challenges and new job roles and responsibilities.

This boost in confidence will also improve their emotional and mental health. What’s more, it will increase their productivity.

Enhancing your creativity and problem-solving capabilities

Joining software development courses, seminars, conferences, and other reskilling and upskilling programs allows you to learn from the trainer or facilitator and your fellow learners.

Because of this, you will be able to come across new perspectives, techniques, and strategies that can help you think outside the box.

Whether you come across a problem that requires innovative solutions or need to create something new that has never been done before, you can also use the knowledge you learned from others to meet these challenges.

Broadening your mind

Continuous learning allows you to expand your mind and perceptions, thereby helping you change your attitude.

The more you learn, the better you will be at seeing things from different perspectives.

Your open-mindedness can help you relate and communicate with people more effectively. Whether you want to broaden your professional network or social circle, your new outlook and attitude can set you on the right track.

Getting the Most Out of Continuous Learning

When engaging in continuous learning, consider trying out different strategies. Aside from taking formal in-classroom and online courses, seminars, and workshops, be open to joining employee and managerial training programs.

Participating in social learning opportunities, such as team meetings or discussions and collaborations, are also effective strategies for upskilling and reskilling.

Coaching, mentoring, and on-the-job training programs also count as social learning opportunities, and thus, will contribute to your personal and career growth.

Lastly, there is also nothing wrong with branching out if you are interested in other fields. If you have the opportunity, learn skills not related to software development but can still contribute to your personal and career growth.

A project management, business writing, or employee motivation training course are excellent options to add to your portfolio.

Learning should be a continuous process. Always include it in your goals to experience growth personally and in your career.

Sincerely,

Jerrin

Jerrin Samuel is the Executive Director at Regional Educational Institute (REI) in Abu Dhabi. Since 1995, REI has been at the forefront of education by delivering quality corporate training courses in the UAE, helping many businesses and organizations achieve greater productivity and higher customer satisfaction levels.

Take jobs that help you grow

This is a guest post from Adam Steel. Enjoy.

Dear New Developer,

Getting your first developer job can feel like a big accomplishment. And it is! It can feel so big and you can feel so relieved to have any job at all that you might start to develop your worldview around that one job. “This is how things are in the real world” you might tell yourself. “I’m lucky to be here,” you murmur. “Leaving too soon looks bad on your resume,” says an older friend.

This sort of thinking can be entrapping. I’m writing to show you a better way.

The spectrum of jobs and companies in tech is broad. To understand how the world is and what your options are you have to take a couple samples and grow, grow, grow! To that end, there are three “traps” I see developers get stuck in early in their career.

The first trap: Spending too long at your first job

In your first 3-4 years, it’s critical that you fuel your motivation and inspiration into learning and growing. It’s also a critical time for a steep increase in your salary. Too many companies fail to recognize that a junior developer’s abilities are growing far faster than their compensation and responsibilities. Or it’s recognized but the company cannot afford to promote or give a raise. It’s up to you to take the reins and move to a new job to find the new challenges and new salary that match where you are in your career. This is especially true for self taught and boot camp taught developers.

How long is too long? How long is enough?

“Enough” time as a junior can be surprisingly short, depending on how you learn. At 6 months it is reasonable to consider switching jobs if you are learning quickly. Not for all positions you’ll hold, but specifically for this first one. Juniors are paid less because they need to come up to speed on all the terminology, tooling and processes.

Once you don’t need hand holding to tackle moderately complex features, you will be far more attractive to other companies. Occasionally a company may recognize and reward your growth, but that is rare.

Stay longer only if you’re feeling significantly rewarded and challenged. Which brings me to…

The second trap: Not investing in learning

Building business software in teams requires a set of skills that are hard to acquire in the absence of customers and a team working to support them. This learning curve can only be tackled when you have these components. And the best way to move along the learning curve is to take a job that helps you learn faster!

What does a “learning” job look like?

“Learning” jobs tend to have similar characteristics. There are resources to learn from and the autonomy to work however suits you best. There is time built into the team’s cadence to allow for research, either organic time throughout your week or time specifically set aside.

Most importantly, there are lots of smart people who give you feedback and engage in discussions about the best way to do things. These people will focus on things like best practices, optimization and customer value. Often they argue! While the arguments might excite you or wear you down, they should feel overall productive and, at the end of the day, move the team toward its goals.

Think of a learning job like an additional career investment, beyond whatever you’ve already paid to learn before your first job. What you need is exposure to good ideas in the context of solving a business problem with an experienced team, and a good learning job gives you that. You may take a lower salary in the short term, but by expanding your knowledge your career will be more fulfilling long term.

What should I avoid?

The list of positions where learning is difficult is much longer than the list of “learning jobs”, but here are some examples:

  • Isolation: Working alone is the hardest career decision to come back from, but it’s especially destructive in your first job. If you aren’t challenged by the ideas of multiple people, your world becomes small. You also won’t have a chance to build your network.
  • Micromanagement: Good companies work to give their developers autonomy and space to do the right thing. If someone is managing the details of your daily life, you aren’t learning how to flex that autonomy muscle. For example, once I had a job where a senior manager stood over my shoulder and dictated what he wanted to see as I wrote code.
  • Lack of visibility: Do you get a chance to learn how the pieces fit together? Do you get a chance to fit them together? A narrow field of view restricts your ability to build a larger context. For example, are you only ever asked to fix specific bugs, or are you encouraged to think about the larger architecture while building new features?
  • Unsafe environment: If we don’t feel safe, we cannot learn well. Depending on the threat, there could also be much bigger concerns. Examples include, but are not limited to, yelling or harassment of any kind. Leave as quickly as you safely can.

The third trap: “Being glue”

“Being glue” is when your role is focused on filling gaps like coordinating between teams and keeping everyone organized, as opposed to actually writing software. Especially in smaller, more dysfunctional teams it can be a tempting role to fill. The team needs it, after all! It’s an important role for managers and higher level engineers to fill, but if you step into it too early it will stunt your learning curve and can leave you forever feeling like you are “behind” the rest of the team. It’s first (and best) described in this noidea blog post.

Once you are technically competent, and everyone knows it, consider taking on this work.

Finding a job that maximizes your growth

There’s no silver bullet for this problem. My best advice is to try to develop the ability to “sniff out” the kinds of companies you’re looking for. Did someone impressive speak at a meetup or write an inspiring blog post? Track down where they work. Job descriptions that are well written and articulate good values are promising. And if you end up in a job that you misjudged and find yourself stagnating, don’t feel guilty about quickly moving on.

Consultancies with great practices, like TestDouble, can be great accelerators for your learning. Changing projects more frequently results in a broader experience, but at the predictable cost of less experience with how your decisions in a codebase will age.

What does a “good” job description look like?

Writing a good job description is hard, but the best companies will put in the effort to do it right. Some attributes of good job descriptions include:

  • Reasonably correct English and readable formatting
  • A description of philosophies and values that align with yours
  • Reasonable requirements (e.g. no CS degree required for a junior level frontend position)
  • Specifically calls out personal traits like kindness or empathy as desirable

What can I ask in interviews to vet the position?

Remember that interviews are your chance to interview them as well. Examples of questions you could ask include:

  • What best practices do you think have made your team successful?
  • What kind of developers thrive at your company?
  • How do you support developers when they come onto a team?

How frequently can I change jobs?

This is a hot topic, but varies by which part of the industry you’re in. Early on, hopping jobs more quickly is fine. 3 jobs in your first 3 years? Not uncommon. Working in startups especially can lead to shorter tenure as companies fail or are acquired.

However, there are skills and wisdom you will only be able to build by staying longer. For example, no amount of training or reading will result in the wisdom you gain by wrestling with a technology decision you made over a year ago as you watch it cause painful issues.

The resume to avoid building is the one with only <2 year tenures over a 10 or 20 year career.

Happy growing!

Adam

Adam Steel is the VP of Engineering at TrueCoach. He lives outside Boulder, CO.