Avoid being an expert beginner

Dear new developer,

This post by Erik Dietrich covers the situation where a developer becomes an “expert beginner”. This is something to avoid as you build your career–don’t work in a place where you are isolated or unable to progress. He breaks progress in any area down into a number of components–Beginner, Advanced Beginner, Competent, etc.

As such, Advanced Beginners can break one of two ways: they can move to Competent and start to grasp the big picture and their place in it, or they can ‘graduate’ to Expert Beginner by assuming that they’ve graduated to Expert. This actually isn’t as immediately ridiculous as it sounds. Let’s go back to my erstwhile bowling career and consider what might have happened had I been the only or best bowler in the alley. I would have started out doing poorly and then quickly picked the low hanging fruit of skill acquisition to rapidly advance. Dunning-Kruger notwithstanding, I might have rationally concluded that I had a pretty good aptitude for bowling as my skill level grew quickly. And I might also have concluded somewhat rationally (if rather arrogantly) that me leveling off indicated that I had reached the pinnacle of bowling skill. After all, I don’t see anyone around me that’s better than me, and there must be some point of mastery, so I guess I’m there.

This post is worth reading in whole. It resonates with me because I’ve spent most of my career in small companies. I do that because it fits best with my desires and my life goals. But I’m acutely aware that as I become more experienced, I am typically one of the most experienced technical folks in the room. This is a problem, because I could believe that I had most or all of the answers based on my experience (what the Expert Beginner believes).

I strenuously combat that by engaging with my peers in person and online, and I think this is a great way to do so. It’s not as deep an engagement as working with them, of course, but affords me the ability to work at small companies.

Ways to engage with the larger software community include:

The work environment you are in is a great place to level up, but depending on your situation, you may end up with few people you can learn from. In that case, it is imperative that you improve yourself through engaging with the larger software community.

Sincerely,

Dan

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