Create Value for People

This is a guest post from Minh Pham. Enjoy.

Dear new developer,

I want to start off by saying Congrats and Good job. If you’re reading this, it’s likely you know how to code – and even if you’re still working on getting that first job, that means you have one of the most desirable skill sets in the world today. I congratulate you because getting here took work. You weren’t born with this knowledge, and even if you felt like it came naturally, it was still a journey of discovery, learning, and practice that got you where you are today.

As you look towards your first job – I want to offer you a single piece of advice that may act as your career’s guiding north star:

Create Value for People.

When you have the power to create anything, you begin to realize the importance isn’t on the code you’re writing but rather why you’re writing it in the first place. What value are you creating through your skill? This is why companies hire people like yourself. They are seeking out individuals who can ultimately deliver value to their customers, particularly through software. As you mature, you will realize that much of engineering has little to do with how fancy your solution is, and instead has everything to do with what problem it solves for the user. Once you accept this, you’ll begin to see that discussions of tech choice and code structure rarely matters outside the context of what business value it represents.

This is where your focus should stay.

Obsessions with patterns and algorithms don’t serve anyone’s mission by themselves. Ignore the constant pressure to assert yourself through syntactic cleverness and obscure trivia. These things don’t matter. These things don’t drive value for anyone. No matter how many “experienced” engineers tell you these are important, I promise you no company hires people simply for them to recite principles and algorithms.

While coding might be your latest skill set, it is by no means an engineer’s only skillset. Remember that at the end of the day, it doesn’t matter if your code is ugly, fancy, verbose or concise – the value you create matters. Strive to be an excellent communicator, a quality teammate, and an outstanding human. These attributes will guide your engineering efforts to ensure you bring value.

No matter where your career goes, if you focus on creating value for people, opportunities will never be in short supply. Desire for specific skills may rise and fall, but people will always look to those who can create value.

With that, I wish you the best of luck and may our journeys cross again,

Minh Pham

Minh Pham believes you should lead how you want to be led. This has been the guiding principle of his career since he started. As an Engineer, he always wished he had someone who would guide him – telling him what’s important, what he has to work on, and what he should ignore. Having gone through all that and then some, Minh now looks to be the positive influence he wishes he had.

As a manager, Minh’s greatest passion was teaching people the skills to create and drive the careers they want to have. Now as a career coach, he works to show people they have the power to build the life they want.

Minh believes anyone can do it – and he promises it doesn’t involve linked lists or graph traversals.

Show up

This is a guest post from Elise Shaffer. Enjoy.

Dear New Developers,

As I sit down to write this letter, I’m struck by the thought that I don’t know you. You could be like me, a person who’s loved computers since she was nine years old and has taken every opportunity to learn more about them. You could also be one of the many people who’ve recently graduated a coding bootcamp after spending years in another career. You might have an experience somewhere in between or vastly outside the two.

So, the challenge put to me is to give advice about starting out in development that would be applicable to you given the wide range experiences that might have brought you here. Thinking about that led me to a revelation that the best advice I could give is to show up.

Software is about human relationships. I know this is a point that’s appeared on this blog before. I won’t rehash all the reasons that’s true, but I will use it as a starting point to say that it’s important to have people with diverse experience designing software. It’s important that no matter where you are coming from that you show up. Bring your experiences, struggles, values, and tastes to your work as a developer.

You’re starting out and will probably feel that you need to catch up to your peers. Certainly, there is always more to learn in software development. But you also have so much to teach those around you. Maybe you have an aunt who needs assistive technologies to use the web. Maybe a computing error caused trouble in your previous career. It’s easy to get lost in everything you don’t know. But, it’s just as important to draw on your previous experiences. For example, maybe you used to work in manufacturing safety systems. Safety is incredibly important in manufacturing and it’s also important in software. Or, you might have taken foreign language and culture electives in college that help you understand how design decisions will be received internationally. How can those experiences help you work on projects with your team?

Don’t be afraid to ask stupid questions. It might seem like a stupid question to you, but it’s more likely that what you’re asking is something the rest of your team takes for granted.

Software should support people. In order to do that it has to understand people and the only way to ensure that, is for those designing it to draw upon the biggest well of experiences possible.

There is always more to learn about programming. But, you already know so much that you don’t even realize. Bring that knowledge and experience to your work as a developer.

Best,

Elise

Elise has been fascinated with computers since she was a child. She’s worked in the field for ten years across a few industries and now works as a Senior Software Engineer. She also blogs at eliseshaffer.com.

Software is about people, not code

Dear new developer,

When I was starting out, I thought that software development was all about code. After all, that was the main thing I was working on. Well, maybe not the main thing, as I needed to know what code to write, how to interface with other code, what was the problem being solved, how to deliver it, the correctness of the code, and how it could be maintained.

But, the writing the code felt like the most important part of the job. It was certainly the most tangible and fundamental. After all, if the code doesn’t work, all those other things won’t matter, right?

This led me to focus on how to write code. I wrote up a style guide for the company. Researched new technologies. Read and commented in online forums. Learned how to decompile java bytecode to reverse engineer proprietary software. Argued about code formatting. Joined a design patterns discussion group. Attended meetups and blogged.

I undertook all of these activities to be better at writing code.

However, I eventually learned that people were far more important for the success of a software project than code. This crystallized for me after I saw a few very interesting (to me!) codebases abandoned for lack of a market or other business flaws.

This was a surprise to me, insofar as I’d assumed the code was the most important part of software development. But really:

  • Software and code is created for people and their purposes. It doesn’t exist on its own, isolated from human needs.
  • People will use the tools or applications built with code (or, worse, they won’t). This means that they have to be bought in to what is being built and consulted about functionality.
  • Most people don’t know or care about the code. (If they did, they’d likely be a developer.) They’re just trying to get something done. The most beautiful, well tested, flexible, configurable, documented, future proofed codebase that does the wrong thing is useless.

At the end of the day, code is a general purpose tool, just like accounting or research and development. Code must solve real world problems of real people.

Sincerely,

Dan