The Code Will Never Judge You

This is a guest post from Lorna Mitchell. Enjoy.

Dear new developer,

Recently, I decided my seven-year-old niece was old enough for her first programmable device. She has done a little bit of Scratch with me, so I bought her a BBC micro:bit (a very simple programmable device, with a web editor and USB connection, some buttons and some LEDs) and showed her how to get started. Then I said to my sister (whose child this is) “the tears are all part of the software development process, so try not to worry when it happens!”. However many years down the path I am myself, coding is still a rollercoaster and there are some downs as well as some ups.

One thing that makes software development more difficult is wondering if you are really cut out for this. It’s so easy to feel like you are doing software “wrong” in some way. Spoiler: there really isn’t a right way, it’s part art as well as part science. Keep the user in mind and apply the technology the best way you know how; you’ll go far.

Some days it doesn’t feel like it’s going well and you may wonder if you will ever be really good at your chosen profession. On other days, or perhaps overlapping days, other people will think you’re not cut out for it either. Maybe you think your skill set isn’t a good fit (it is), or that you don’t really look like a software developer (you do). It is very difficult to help other humans who have already decided that they don’t quite believe in you. From extensive field testing, I have found that almost none of them ever change their mind.

In fact, this is much less important than it seems. If you don’t understand the pop culture that inspired the bot/server names, you didn’t play the same computer games or watch the same films (I’ve still never seen Star Wars), that doesn’t impact on what you can be. For minorities of all stripes, not sharing the supposedly shared culture can really make you doubt yourself. That’s a human reaction, don’t feel bad for feeling your feelings. If you want to be a person who does play those games and watch those films, then go for it.

But if you are just there to be the best software developer you can be, then let the other things go past you, and focus on the things you really do want to learn from, and share with, the crowd. I think most of what I know about text editors, information security, and leadership I learned from colleagues or conference encounters. It took me far too long to realise that software developers do look and sound like I do, and my own interests and hobbies are no less valid than anyone else’s (I also know more very technical humans with yarncraft hobbies now).

The code will never judge you. You show up, try things out, keep learning, keep iterating. That’s how software is made. It isn’t made of what other people thought you could do, it’s only made of what you did do, and for that you need to show up, and do.

— Lorna

Lorna is based in Yorkshire, UK; she is a Developer Advocate at Vonage as well as a published author and experienced conference speaker. Lorna is passionate about open source technologies and sharing knowledge, code and experiences with developers everywhere. In her spare time, Lorna blogs at https://lornajane.net.

Be Adaptable and Authentic

This is a guest post from Morgan Whaley, lightly edited. Enjoy.

Dear new developer,

Honestly my #1 piece of career or technical advice to new developers is:

Be adaptable and authentic.

I don’t think there is any one magic bullet to helping someone “break into” a job, or business, or new city. Humans are all different and the beauty of diversity in industry and environments is when everyone truly brings themselves and overrides the homogenization that we accuse modern cities and tech of becoming.

If something isn’t working, there’s “no harm, no foul” in changing approaches, or taking a break, or simply admitting something isn’t working.

I see a lot of people who treat that first job like it’s a task they gotta beat into submission and they tie so much self-worth to it. Which is completely understandable… but the more you resist a situation and don’t remain open to possibilities, the more you are going to run into brick walls.

Morgan

PS Also, LEAVE YOUR HOUSE AND GO TALK TO PEOPLE FACE TO FACE OH MY GOD PLEASE IT’LL BE OK.

Morgan Whaley is a Senior Prototype Architect at Charter Communications.

How to start blogging

Dear new developer,

I was asked about how to start blogging during the Q&A portion of a talk I gave. I had offhandedly recommended blogging as a great way to make connections and to be both credible and findable (locatable?) when looking for a job.

I started to spout off an answer using WordPress, and the questioner said “what about medium?”. And I stopped short. The correct answer is was “whatever is easiest”. I realized that this needed a bit more explanation, hence this letter.

So, the first thing to realize is that almost no one will read it, especially at the beginning. Why would you write if no one will read it? Well, to clarify your thought, to provide a written record of what you’ve done, and because, if you keep at it, Google will find it. Google is great at the long tail, so if you write something that is of interest to anyone, eventually people will find it.

Some numbers. This blog had the following stats for the first six months:

  • Sep: 8 posts/5 visitors
  • Oct: 11 posts/20 visitors
  • Nov: 6/15
  • Dec: 9/219
  • Jan: 8/221
  • Feb: 9/223

For the first month, I wrote more posts than visitors! And for the first three months, I had 25 posts and only 40 visitors. If you aren’t ready and willing to commit for a fair bit of time, your blog will become one of those sad blogs that I occasionally run across with three great posts, then one post six months later with the title “I haven’t posted in a while…” and then nothing.

Now, if that’s what you want, that’s ok (everyone can blog for their own reasons) but if you are looking for credibility and locatability, well, that kind of blog accomplishes neither.

So, commit for six months. I do this by:

  • writing out 20-30 titles of blog posts I want to write. If I can’t come up with that many blog post titles, I am not passionate enough about the topic to stick with it. Better to find out before investing the effort.
  • Watch for interesting concepts and mailing myself whenever I have a possible blog post idea. Then I can search my email when I have time to write but no ideas. (You can do the same with a spreadsheet, doc, trello board or whatever. Just capture the inspiration when you can.)
  • Make some posts easy by doing excerpts or commentary (about half of the posts on this blog are excerpts or guest posts).
  • Settle on a consistent schedule. No need to announce it, though. (Some people do it daily, for which I have mad respect.)
  • Write blog posts ahead of time and schedule them out. When the muse is present, it can be easy to jam out a few posts. When the muse is absent, it is a relief to not need write, but still be able to deliver to previously mentioned consistent schedule.
  • Realize that some of the posts will be mediocre. It is embarrassing to put out poor content. Don’t do that, but some posts will be better than others. Volume is key, and the longer you do it, the better the posts will get.

As far as the actual writing tool, use whatever is comfortable and easy. That may be wordpress.com, may be medium, may be netlify + hugo. Whatever it is, don’t let the technology get in the way of the writing. Especially if you are a developer, it can be more fun to be in weeds tweaking your blog deployment pipeline (at least, that’s really fun for me) but that will distract you from the main goal, which is to create good content.

My final tip is to share on online communities. Don’t only share your own work, but definitely share it. Which community? Well, find out where your people are. There are a lot of communities out there, whether tech specific like Hacker News, general purpose and public like Twitter, or focused and private, like the HangOps Slack. (Sharing is how I was able to break through in December above.)

Doesn’t matter what it is, as long as you are engaged in the community and the topic of your blog is of interest to the community. These communities are well aware of the traffic they can bring and are often wary of newcomers. I have gotten a few scoldings when I posted things that I thought were interesting, but were not in line with the community. That’s OK, just accept the community judgement, acknowledge the mistake, and do better.

Blogging is a great way to amplify your voice, display your expertise and share your knowledge. Set yourself up for success when you start one.

Sincerely,

Dan

Justin Kan on whether you should work at a startup

Dear new developer,

Justin Kan has deep experience in the startup space, including at an accelerator called Y Combinator. He gave a talk about why you should work for a startup, and why you shouldn’t. Here’s the transcript,, and here’s a blog post based on it. If you’re looking for good management, avoid startups:

The management at startups generally sucks. I wish I was joking, but sadly it is very true.

On the flip side of that:

At a startup, you will get access to jobs that you are completely unqualified for and you might not be able to do well (yet).

(Possibly the two are related!) There’s a lot more good advice in there, well worth the read.

As a new developer, you may have a risk profile that allows you to work at a small startup. If you can swing it, you’ll never have an opportunity to learn more about how to build a business. The first few years of your career are precious and should be spent carefully. The more experienced I get, the less risk I want to take (all other things being equal), and I’ve seen that be the case for most of my colleagues.

How can you choose the right place? I’m no expert there, as I’ve fallen into several great jobs. But I’d recommend:

  • working at a place with no jerks
  • optimizing for learning

That’s about it. Yes, make sure you are paid market rate. Yes, make sure you are being challenged. Yes, don’t get taken advantage of. But for the first few years of your career you have the opportunity to take positions at pay levels and in areas that may be closed off later in your career.

Choose wisely.

Sincerely,

Dan

How to market yourself as a new software developer

Dear new developer,

This post from Corey Snipes, an experienced software developer, is well worth a read. From the post:

People skills help so much. It’s hard to overstate that. I am a competent software developer, but I am really good at working on a team and that has carried me to increasingly sophisticated and interesting work my whole career.

There may be some kinds of software jobs where communication is not important. Maybe something in academia? Maybe finance? I don’t know, but every software job I’ve ever been in has fallen into one of a few categories:

  • working on a team. Here communication is important as it helps keep the team aligned and moving toward the correct goal
  • working by myself. Here communication is important because I’m talking to customers about what they need.

So I agree with Corey that communication is crucial.

It’s important to be clear about your limits but also about your potential. New developers are hired for potential. Again, from Corey’s post:

Be honest about your capabilities. Some people will say “fake it till you make it” but that doesn’t work for me and I’m no good at it anyway. I’d rather work with someone who knows their limitations than someone who thinks they know everything, and that’s the sort of person that I try to be. Figure out how to acknowledge your inexperience without making it sound like a problem.

The post is full of other good tips for folks starting out. He talks about two different places where a new software developer can deliver a lot of value: a paid position in a large software team and a volunteer position building something for a small business. I’m not a huge fan of volunteering because I feel like people should be paid for value they provide, but I understand that when one doesn’t have a track record, one needs to build one any which way. Open source contributions are a great way to do that, but this activity is less focused and a longer play than finding a local business that needs a website and just putting one together.

Another tip that resonated was going to meetups and getting out into the community, but I’ve already written about that.

Sincerely,

Dan