When is it time to quit my 9-5?

This is a guest post from Pariss Athena. Enjoy.

Dear new developer,

Honestly, I don’t think there’s one absolute answer. I believe the answer depends on you and the risk you’re comfortable taking. However, I do think there are things you should take into account before jumping the gun. This is how I personally knew it was time to give my notice and take my business full time…

Everyone’s situation is going to be different. This is my story.

I announced that I was launching Black Tech Pipeline (BTP) in June of 2020. Around this time is when everyone was really riding the Black Lives Matter train, and claiming their allyship after George Floyd’s murder.

This was not why I decided to launch. Weeks prior to the pandemic and quarantine, I was constantly tweeting about launching BTP “in the next weeks.” Those next few weeks just happened to fall during a tragic time.

But these two things did contribute to the eagerness of announcing my launch:

  1. I knew my performance at work was dropping. I stopped attending happy hours, and engaging in conversation. It wasn’t because there was something wrong with the company I worked for, my focus just shifted.
    I was rightfully distracted by social media and the flooding of content surrounding the injustices happening in the Black community. Knowing the work I should be doing full time vs the work I was actually doing full time made me annoyed with myself. I wanted to just help create impact in my community. That’s it.
  2. I was pissed the hell off.

I want to preface this by saying that I know I have the privilege of already having a platform and a following. I know that contributed to the traction my launch announcement received.

I had been writing newsletters surrounding Black Lives Matter a few weeks before announcing my launch, and those newsletters gained lots of traction on social media, which gained me more subscribers. I decided to announce the launch of BTP in my newsletter, and the response to the announcement was sign #1 that I was going to be on my way out of my job.

My calendar was flooded with calls. I had 15 minute breaks in between calls from morning to evening. I was talking to employer after employer wanting to take advantage of BTP’s services. Aside from calls, I received emails non-stop. Not just from employers, but from opportunity extenders of all sorts. It was tiring but good problems to have, especially before even launching.

On top of my performance dropping at work from being distracted by the political climate, I was now also distracted by BTP’s calendar being completely booked. Having so many calls booked seems promising, but until I had client agreements signed and invoices paid, I wasn’t going to leave my job, especially during a pandemic.

Plenty of employers expressed interest. They loved the origin story of #BlackTechTwitter and how it led to me building Black Tech Pipeline. There were lots of promising words, but you can’t go off of words of interest to determine your safety net.

The way I determined my safety net was by looking at my finances with my mentor, Leon Noel. I kept in mind what I was making annually at my 9-5. I already knew what I was charging for my services so I also used that to think about worst and best case scenario. He told me to ask myself:

  1. At the very least, how much do you need to make to pay your bills on time?
  2. Are you willing to give up your typical lifestyle?

I looked at my pricing model and mapped out how many clients I’d have to have per month to get by. And not just how many clients, but:

  1. Which services would those clients have to pay for in order for me to get by?
  2. And when those clients pay me, how much money do I have left over after putting 30-35% into savings for tax time and personal savings?
  3. And if I don’t want to live a life of just getting by, how much money do I need to make, with tax deductions in mind, to live the life that I want to live?
  4. How much money would I like to make annually? What will it take to get there? Can I project that?
  5. Is it possible that I can stay at my 9-5 and balance my business at the same time?
  6. Could I potentially hire someone to help me out so that I can do both?

Those numbers and questions are extremely important and it’s what you should think about before making the decision to bounce from your 9-5.

Sign #2: Personally, time was not on my side. It came to a point where something had to give. It wasn’t fair to continue working my 9-5 when I wasn’t giving it my all because I was busy prioritizing my own business. I also wasn’t willing to give up potential clients, miss calls, and wait to reply to business emails for the sake of my 9-5.

Sign #3: Potential clients turned into paying clients. Agreements were getting signed, and invoices were being paid. That sounds dope, but that’s not enough to say you’re secure. The question is,

  1. With the money you’ve been paid + your savings (if any), would you be able to quit your job and be able to pay your bills for the next 6 months, even if you got no other paying clients?
  2. How many signed/not yet paid clients do you currently have?
  3. What’s your projected paying client rate for the next month?
  4. What are you going to do if you don’t have any new business coming in?

These are the risk questions, and you have to be very real with yourself when you answer them. The last thing you want is give yourself optimistic answers and then be left with late payments, debt, and serious financial hardship.

My personal answers: I’d be fine. I determined this by the tangible money I had been paid. I didn’t count the client agreements signed because anyone can back out of an agreement before the work begins, something could delay the process on their end, etc. I made enough to feel confident in giving my job my notice, and to continue living the life I want to be able to live. I only considered signed agreements when I thought about future business expectations: “I have {x} many clients potentially secured for {x} services, which will keep me financially stable for {x months}. I also have {x} many potential client calls lined up for the next {x weeks/months}.”

I also double checked with my mentor, and when he approved, I felt even more confident in leaving.

It was bittersweet, but I gave my notice. It was time. ✨Shout out to G2i for being the best employer I’ve worked for since entering the tech industry. Amazing culture, dope people, and doing the work of solving the broken vetting process.

Now, I don’t know what’s going to happen with Black Tech Pipeline. Maybe things are only going well right now and we’ll struggle later down the line. I don’t know, I hope not. I will do everything in my power to make this company successful, but there’s only so much that I have control over. That’s the risk. That’s entrepreneurship for ya.

If I’m being totally honest, a job will always be there. Companies will always be hiring. I know- I’m a recruiter.

— Pariss

This post was originally published at Black Tech Pipeline.

Pariss Athena is the creator of the movement, hashtag, and community #BlackTechTwitter, and Founder of Black Tech Pipeline.

Potential vs delivery

Dear new developer,

Early in your career you are judged on potential. Frankly, this is because when you are young in your career, you don’t have much of a track record, so there’s not much else to judge you on.

This means that you can take more risks early in your career. You can shift around and explore different niches, whether technology or business size or domain. Each time you shift, you’ll bring over some relevant experience, but you’ll also be high potential and indicate a willingness to learn.

Companies have to train you on their process and their technology stack, and don’t necessarily expect you to ship on day one.

The older you get, however, the less you are judged on your potential, and the more you are judged on your ability to deliver. This is typically done by looking at your past accomplishments, as what you’ve done in the past is treated as a harbinger of the future.

While there still is spin up time (and the bigger the company, the longer the period; I worked at a large software company where people were surprised I shipped code in the first week) there’s an expectation that you slot in and pick things up more quickly when you are a more senior developer.

As you gain more experience, you have more human capital and are expected to deploy that capital on behalf of your employer.

Does that mean that once you’re a senior developer you can’t switch domains, tech stacks or company size? Absolutely not. But it does mean that you’ll have a harder time doing so and you’ll need to convince the hiring managers that your skill sets apply to the new venture. (There’s an entire book about doing this called What Color is Your Parachute.) You can always press the reset button and re-enter as a junior developer, if you can afford it, and if you can convince the hiring manager that you won’t leave the job as soon as you can find another one.

Take risks early.

Sincerely,

Dan