Things good engineers do

Dear new developer,

I found this post covered some things that good software engineers do. It doesn’t focus on the technical aspects, but on other aspects of software development. Things they do:

  • Ask for help
  • Work on one thing at a time
  • Prioritise unblocking

My favorite quote:

In software development we rarely have the luxury of a todo list with a single item on it. Despite this, we are not able to work on two things simultaneously. Every time you work on one thing and change to another you pay the cost of mentally (and sometimes in development environment) context switching. As a result the most efficient way to work is generally to take one task to completion before starting another task.

These are all key things for engineers to do. The first makes sure you aren’t beating your head against the wall unnecessarily. The second makes sure you can focus on one thing and avoid context switching. For many kinds of development work, this is the most efficient way to accomplish a task. The third acknowledges that you should optimize for team productivity over individual productivity.

Three great pieces of advice. Worth reading the whole post, “Some Things Good Engineers Do”.

Sincerely,

Dan

Don’t try to change the tabbing / bracing style

This is a guest post from Andrew Rondeau. Enjoy.

Dear New Developer,

Don’t show up an a new job and immediately try to change the tabbing and/or bracing style. This is especially important if the codebase you work on has a very consistent style that all of the other developers follow.

Why? Tabbing and bracing styles are really a matter of personal preference. What’s important is that the codebase is readable, and keeping a consistent tabbing and bracing style is more important than having your favorite style. Furthermore, because tabbing and bracing styles are really a matter of personal preference, arguing with the more senior developers about this topic is a waste of everyones’ time. The senior developers, or your manager, will probably assume that you have poor time management skills, or that you get obsessed with details that don’t matter.

And, yes: An interesting discussion can be had over the merits of tabs versus spaces, or the merits of braces before or after the newline. The problem is that some people really get irrationally attached to whichever style they are used to. These discussions don’t fix bugs or deliver features that the business needs to survive; thus, don’t waste time and stick with whatever tabbing and bracing style your codebase uses.

When is it important to discuss tabs versus spaces, or bracing styles, as a new developer? When a codebase has an inconsistent style, especially if it doesn’t match a team’s style guide! Politely point out to your manager, or lead, that there is a lot of inconsistent use of tabs and/or braces; and suggest a tool that will automatically reformat the code. Perhaps suggest a style that a well-known open-source project uses, or a well-known style guide published by Microsoft or Apple. At that point, it’s your manager or lead’s discretion if your team will adopt a new style.

If your team does agree to change the tabbing and/or bracing style, don’t do it gradually. Why? Again, a consistent style is more important than being able to write code with your preferred tabbing or bracing style. Inconsistent code is harder to read, and confuses people about what the established style really is. It also tempts people to stick with their preferred style, instead of whatever the team agreed to. Instead, use an automated tool to reformat the code.

— Andrew

Andrew is the desktop client architect for Syncplicity, a file synchronization product. Here’s his LinkedIn profile.