Job hunting tips for new developers

Dear new developer,

Joe Marshall has some interesting tips for new developers (he calls them “junior developers to be” but developer nomenclature is so broken that I prefer the term “new”). They are focused around finding a job (and Joe has a newsletter to help 🙂 ).

They range from the simple: “Read coding interview books.” to the arduous: “Github helps, but take it beyond toys. Real projects have stakeholders.” to the practical: “Take notes during interviews.”

I purposely focus on all that you need to know to succeed as a new developer apart from getting a job (though I have written a few things about interviews). I do this for two reasons:

  1. I’m no expert at getting a job as a junior developer. It’s been a long time since I did that, and the world has changed. I’m not sure I’m a good resource to help anyone get a development job, since I’ve only gotten hired for full time employment four times in my career.
  2. There are a lot of other great resources out there, and it’s a topic that many write about (because it matters a lot)

But this choice doesn’t mean I can’t point to helpful posts elsewhere. Suggest you read the whole thing.

Sincerely,

Dan

Choose an employer who treats you well during an interview

Dear new developer,

You may not realize it, but you have a lot of power during the interview. Sure, it doesn’t feel like it, but right now a lot of companies are seeking developers, and you are desired.

There are many many things to consider when taking a job, but one strong indicator of how you’ll be treated during your employment is how you are treated in the interview.

  • is the interviewer respectful
  • do they do what they say they are going to do
  • are they flexible
  • do they keep in touch

Basically, you will never have more power in the employer/employee relationship than you do when you are interviewing, because you have the most optionality (that is, you can talk to other employers with little to no friction). It’s definitely not the only thing that matters, but poor interview treatment indicates, in my experience, a general lack of concern which will lead to other unpleasantness.

If they don’t treat you right then, how will they treat you once you don’t have any other options.

Think about it.

Sincerely,

Dan