The Code Will Never Judge You

This is a guest post from Lorna Mitchell. Enjoy.

Dear new developer,

Recently, I decided my seven-year-old niece was old enough for her first programmable device. She has done a little bit of Scratch with me, so I bought her a BBC micro:bit (a very simple programmable device, with a web editor and USB connection, some buttons and some LEDs) and showed her how to get started. Then I said to my sister (whose child this is) “the tears are all part of the software development process, so try not to worry when it happens!”. However many years down the path I am myself, coding is still a rollercoaster and there are some downs as well as some ups.

One thing that makes software development more difficult is wondering if you are really cut out for this. It’s so easy to feel like you are doing software “wrong” in some way. Spoiler: there really isn’t a right way, it’s part art as well as part science. Keep the user in mind and apply the technology the best way you know how; you’ll go far.

Some days it doesn’t feel like it’s going well and you may wonder if you will ever be really good at your chosen profession. On other days, or perhaps overlapping days, other people will think you’re not cut out for it either. Maybe you think your skill set isn’t a good fit (it is), or that you don’t really look like a software developer (you do). It is very difficult to help other humans who have already decided that they don’t quite believe in you. From extensive field testing, I have found that almost none of them ever change their mind.

In fact, this is much less important than it seems. If you don’t understand the pop culture that inspired the bot/server names, you didn’t play the same computer games or watch the same films (I’ve still never seen Star Wars), that doesn’t impact on what you can be. For minorities of all stripes, not sharing the supposedly shared culture can really make you doubt yourself. That’s a human reaction, don’t feel bad for feeling your feelings. If you want to be a person who does play those games and watch those films, then go for it.

But if you are just there to be the best software developer you can be, then let the other things go past you, and focus on the things you really do want to learn from, and share with, the crowd. I think most of what I know about text editors, information security, and leadership I learned from colleagues or conference encounters. It took me far too long to realise that software developers do look and sound like I do, and my own interests and hobbies are no less valid than anyone else’s (I also know more very technical humans with yarncraft hobbies now).

The code will never judge you. You show up, try things out, keep learning, keep iterating. That’s how software is made. It isn’t made of what other people thought you could do, it’s only made of what you did do, and for that you need to show up, and do.

— Lorna

Lorna is based in Yorkshire, UK; she is a Developer Advocate at Vonage as well as a published author and experienced conference speaker. Lorna is passionate about open source technologies and sharing knowledge, code and experiences with developers everywhere. In her spare time, Lorna blogs at https://lornajane.net.

You’re gonna be OK

This is a guest post from Jerome Hardaway. Enjoy.

Dear new developer,

So, you’re in the office, learning a million things a minute that you were never exposed to. Everyone around you seems super competent and you don’t want to take time away from them, but you have no idea what you’re doing. You feel like you should probably be a janitor instead of working on a million dollar web app. I’m here to tell you, you’re wrong.

Every person who seems competent has felt like you or still feels like you do, they are just better at hiding it. I know people who have been doing this work for years and feel silly at least once a week. Hitting your head against the tech wall is a rite of passage here and normal and whether they tell you or not, we have all been there. We have all either accidentally taken down prod, nuked the repo, felt lost, accidentally ran up the AWS bill, and just straight up sucked at this job. So long as you focus on having more good days than bad, you will be fine. More than that, you’ll do great, so relax cause we are all rooting for you.

— Jerome

Jerome Hardaway is a Developer Advocate at Quicken Loans and Executive Director at Vets Who Code, Where they help veterans get jobs in software by teaching them how to program for free.

Advice to New Developers From A Googler

Dear new developer,

Monica Dinculescu, who works at Google, has some good advice for new developers. I don’t agree with everything she says (ah, the cacophony) but some of it definitely resonates. She has a unique approach to an AMA (ask me anything) using GitHub issues.

My favorite answer was to this question:

Sometimes I feel like I’m not good enough to become a professional software developer

I think you’re putting too much pressure on yourself! Feeling like you’re not good enough is so standard in life it even has its own name: impostor syndrome. All the developers I know, myself included, have on countless occasions thought everyone else was better than them and they just accidentally got lucky. We’ve all been stuck on a problem for days, only to randomly discover a solution after a while, out of nowhere. I find stepping away from it or talking to people helps a lot! I also do this super annoying thing to my co-workers where I explain to them, out loud, the problem I have, but by explaining it to them I end up thinking about a solution. (this also has a name, it’s called rubber ducking!). Anyway, it just takes time and practice to become confident!

We all have difficulties. I remember lying down in my home office, struggling with one of the hardest problems I’ve ever faced (it was how to update a partial recurring reservation for a piece of equipment if the room reservation changed), and thinking “there’s no way I can do this”. I also remember interviewing in March of 2018 and feeling like “man, I am so out of date and useless”.

The joy of technology continually evolving is that I get to learn all the time. The downside is that I feel continually out of date. Chances are you might too.  Remember, if it was easy, we would have automated it.

I hope you enjoy all of Monica’s advice.

Sincerely,

Dan