Three Mantras to Live By

This is a guest post from Dave Mayer. Enjoy.

Dear New Dev-

After 22 years of ‘production level’ experience in the real world, I’m writing to share three mantras that have led to more happiness and more success for us.

To be clear, these are DAILY mantras. Not weekly, not monthly, not annually. Daily.

They are:

  • Surround yourself with people smarter than you
  • Build community and give without expecting anything in return
  • Listen to your gut, without exception.

Surround yourself every-damn-day with people who are smarter than you

You’ll never be, nor should you, be the smartest person in the room. Confucius reportedly wrote ‘if you are the smartest person in the room, you’re in the wrong room’. Regardless of who wrote those words, they couldn’t be more true. Since high school, I’ve always known that I was smart, but I was also clear that I was not the best at everything and that everyone had something to help me learn or to help me become a better student or a better human.

I’m not suggesting you surround yourself with jerks with a ton of pretense who can’t stop talking about themselves and how smart they are, I’m suggesting that you learn to say ‘I don’t know’, ‘wow, that’s cool, tell me more’, and ‘yes, I could use some help’. Knowing that you will never have all the answers, that it’s okay to ask for help, and having an insatiable curiosity about engineering, life, music and anything that is important to you will get you far in life.

Build community and give without expecting anything in return

In 2006, going into the ‘Great Recession’ we sat in the back of the room at the Boulder-Denver New Tech Meetup and listened to Brad Feld talk about bringing people together and building community (in whatever area and subject that matters to you) with no expectation of anything in return. This idea of #GivingFirst was revolutionary to us thirteen years ago, and it’s been a life-changer for us. It’s a super simple yet elegant idea of walking into a room and asking how you can help someone solve their biggest challenges rather than where-do-they-work-or-what-kind-of-car-do-they-drive. We wrote a detailed article about this topic for CTO Lunches Magazine on page 29- give it a read. It’s truly been life-changing to help others and embrace that as a BUSINESS philosophy, not just a life philosophy. It will all come back to you, you just don’t know how or when, and that’s OK.

Listen to your gut, every day without exception

It sounds simple, but not everyone does it. Your intuition is always right, yet folks second-guess themselves, rethink things and question their own motivations. That’s all healthy, and yes, you should ‘sleep on it’, whatever ‘it’ is. Space gives clarity. In large decisions, I ALWAYS take at least 24 hours to think on what the right answer is for me, and to listen to my gut. It’s NEVER failed me and it will never fail you. I promise.

I hope you will consider even one of these three mantras. You won’t be disappointed.

– Dave

Dave Mayer is a long time community building advocate, and by day he’s CEO of Technical Integrity, a boutique recruiting firm focused on building diverse executive and technical teams for startups in Colorado and beyond.

‘You get what you give’

This is a guest post from Rylan Bowers. Enjoy.

Dear New Developer,

‘You get what you give’ isn’t just a late ’90s catchy pop song set in a late ’90s mall that gives me late ’90s cringe (and nostalgia, but those go hand-in-hand, eh?). It’s also a great way to approach your career! This is something core to the tech scene I’ve adopted in Boulder, Colorado as codified by Techstars with their Give First rule in their Code of Conduct. Their other rules are great ones to build your career around, too.

I have found that giving provides many benefits to the giver:

  1. Offering to help engenders a greater sense of observation and consideration of others’ needs and feelings. This is something we all can work on, given our reputation as social introverts.
  2. It feels good to help others with no strings attached.
  3. If you want to attach (small) strings for your own motivation, you increase how others view you in a positive light.
  4. You may/likely will find rewarding hobbies, coding interests, or other intrinsic rewards without much effort.
  5. You become less arrogant.
  6. You help build your community in a positive way, no matter how small the give is.
  7. People are quicker to recommend you for a job or position if you ever fall on harder times.
  8. It improves your own sense of self-worth and confidence.
  9. You make more friends outside of work.
  10. Did I mention that it just feels good?

My one caveat: There are always people who will take advantage, do try to be open-minded and kind, but watch out for takers, they will burn you out! Thankfully, they are few and far between.

Another great example of this is Jason Cole’s “Year of Giving Dangerously”. I must add that this way of living is out of reach for you as a new developer, but something to keep in mind for over the course of your career. Give in small ways until you can give in bigger ways!

Also, be aware that being seen as only a taker is not a good thing. See my caveat above and think back on any time in your life that you’ve ran into one. Maybe someone who always wanted to copy your answers or homework, but never contributed? Or those group projects where you felt like you were doing all the work? Don’t be a taker.

Volunteer in your community. Be the good you want to see in the world.

– Rylan

Rylan Bowers is a developer, co-organizer of Boulder Startup Week and the Boulder Ruby Meetup, and all around good guy. Follow him on Twitter.