Learn an IDE

Dear new developer,

Just like you should learn a text editor, you should learn an integrated development environment (aka IDE). This is typically a standalone program focused on one or more programming languages. They range from free to a couple of hundred bucks in pricing.

Using an IDE will give you the following benefits:

  • It will be easier to navigate a project. Typically IDEs have a tree view of the entire project. Especially if you are not familiar with the command line, having this may make it easier for you to see how pieces of the project fit together. If the language supports it, an IDE can provide powerful searching capabilities, allowing you to see where a function, method or class is used.
  • Often these have refactoring support. Refactoring allows you to easily rename variables, functions/methods and files. If the language or IDE support it, references to the renamed entity can be updated as well. This will help make the code more fluid.
  • Debugging and code inspecting capabilities can be very useful. You can walk through code that is running locally and see the state of variables and make function calls. This is especially helpful if you have a test that can drive the code and replicate a bug. You can also, if the language supports it, connect to remote servers. (Many languages have command line debuggers as well, but it’s usually easier for a new developer to use an IDE.)
  • The IDE can provide text manipulation functionality. For instance, if you want to add documentation comments to every method, or an easy way to generate boilerplate methods, IDEs can provide this. It’s often easy to customize to your needs as well.
  • Easier learning the language or framework. If you are not sure of the exact name or syntax of a library call, an IDE can suggest it (often based on you typing a few letters). The documentation is often integrated as well, so you can, for example, see the javadoc by mousing over a method call (in a Java friendly IDE).

Obviously, as you see above, an IDE is very powerful. It’s also very tied to a language and the language’s features. If you are using a dynamic language (PHP, ruby) your IDE will have different capabilities than if you are using a statically typed language (C#, Java). But in either case, mastering your IDE will make it easier to write and debug code on your development computer.

Sincerely,

Dan

Balance Questions With “Banging Your Head”

This is a guest blog post from Don Abrams, lightly edited. Enjoy.

Dear new developer,

When starting out, the hard part is balancing two things:

  • Asking questions
  • Banging your head against the wall

Additionally, as a new developer you’ll likely be encountering something for the first time: a codebase that is really really large. Like large enough no one knows all of it. You’ll want to learn how to navigate the codebase ASAP. Every place is different. If you can checkout all the code and get the product running in less than a day, you’re at a world-class shop. If it’s more than a week, I’m sorry.

After you learn to navigate the code, my recommendation is then to learn and copy the patterns that other team members use. So your questions should mostly be “how did someone solve this before?” or “hey, have you seen anything like this before?” If you look at the code they referenced and still have questions, then bring it back up ASAP.

If someone offers to pair, DO IT! Tip on pairing as a junior: be the keyboard and basically have them tell you what to do. You’ll learn how they think about the codebase and learn to navigate it better. You’ll feel stupid when they tell you “just” to do something, but those are the things you need to know. (“just XXX” signals that XXX is complex thing that you’ll take for granted soon– documenting those will really help the next junior).

I also recommend reading a LOT of code.Then, as you get a better command of the codebase and team patterns (3-6 months), you can start asking questions like “why did someone solve this before this way?”

That’s when it gets fun.

Sincerely,

Don Abrams

Don Abrams has over 10 years of software development experience and recently moved to France.