Take care of your body

Dear new developer,

I don’t know how old you are. All I can tell you is that you should take care of your body. This includes tasks that all folks should do (get good sleep, exercise, get the regular checkups for body, eyes, teeth, skin) as well as some tasks specific to desk jockeys (get up, maybe get a standing desk, look away from the computer once in a while) and some tasks specific to being a software engineer (get an ergonomic keyboard).

Whatever you do, listen to your body. Take regular breaks. Buy the equipment you need. When I was young, my body seemed to be an endless resource.

It is not.

Sincerely,

Dan

On surviving your first year as a developer

Dear new developer,

This post covers some great tips on getting through your first year. It starts off ominously:

The first year as a programmer is one of the most frustrating things a homo sapien can experience. You’re thrust from the world of ambiguous human communication into the icy waters of cold, hard correctness. There is no compromise with the machine. It does exactly what you tell it to, no more, no less.

But then moves to some good advice, about advice:

There are very few absolutes when it comes to practical programming. A Technical opinions of developers are based on their experiences, the books they’ve read and the technologies they happened to work with. No one does a thorough survey of the technology landscape before declaring their support for a given tool, application or methodology.

This is so true. Everyone’s opinion is path dependent. I was a MySQL user for years and thought it was the best open source database, until a chance comment from someone I was chatting with at a meetup (see, you should attend a meetup) mentioned that PostgreSQL has transactional DDL. That is, you can alter a table as part of a transaction, and they roll it back. (Happy to report that MySQL has made progress on this, though I don’t believe they are at feature parity yet.) If I hadn’t run into that meetup participant, it is unlikely I would have learned that nuance.

Multiply that experience by the hundreds of decisions a developer makes every year based on their knowledge, their problem space and their work environment and you can see how different advice can be. And to be fair, how it can all be valid, based on context.

The post also covers ego-less coding, what to learn, and the joy of bug hunting. The whole post, “Survive your first year as a programmer”, is worth a read.

Sincerely,

Dan